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Federal Noxious Weed
TDA Noxious Weed
TPWD Prohibited Exotic Species
Invasive Plant Atlas of the US

NOTE: means species is on that list.

Asphodelus fistulosus


Onionweed

Synonym(s): Asphodelus tenuifolius
Family: Liliaceae
Duration and Habit: Perennial Herb


Photographer: USDA APHIS PPQ Archive
Source: USDA APHIS PPQ

Description

Dark green in color and grows 12 to 30 inches tall and 15 inches wide. Numerous smooth, nearly cylindrical hollow leaves. Similar in appearance to onion leaves but lacks the onion scent and taste. The leaves are much shorter than the flowering stem and emerge from the base. Produces one to several stiff upright flower stem(s) up to 2 1/2 feet tall and branched. About three-fourths of an inch across with six petal parts, each white to pink with a brown or reddish stripe along the center. Flowers alternate along the branches. Fruit spherical in shape; divided into three segments. Seeds are brown or black triangular, one-eighth inch long, wrinkled, pitted and three or six per fruit. Thickened root crowns with many fibrous roots and no developed bulb.

Ecological Threat: In pastures and rangeland, onionweed develops populations that exclude grasses and desirable forage species. This federally regulated weed poses a serious environmental and agricultural threat.

Biology & Spread: It seeds prolifically and can establish large populations quickly.

History: Introduced as an ornamental.

U.S. Habitat: Onionweed is found in roadsides, pastures, waste places, disturbed areas, grasslands, and suburban settings. It is drought resistant and prefers sandy or gravelly soils.

Distribution

U.S. Nativity: Introduced

Native Origin: Mediterranean region and from western Asia to northern India

U.S. Present: CA, NM, TX.

If you believe you have found onionweed, please report this species.

Distribution: Found occasionally in Texas, but no reported infestations.

Mapping

Invaders of Texas Map: Asphodelus fistulosus
EDDMapS: Asphodelus fistulosus
USDA Plants Texas County Map: Asphodelus fistulosus

Resembles/Alternatives

Onionweed might be confused with some native onions (Allium spp.)

Management

Can be managed through culitivation. Does not infest regularly worked fields.

USE PESTICIDES WISELY: ALWAYS READ THE ENTIRE PESTICIDE LABEL CAREFULLY, FOLLOW ALL MIXING AND APPLICATION INSTRUCTIONS AND WEAR ALL RECOMMENDED PERSONAL PROTECTIVE GEAR AND CLOTHING. CONTACT YOUR STATE DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE FOR ANY ADDITIONAL PESTICIDE USE REQUIREMENTS, RESTRICTIONS OR RECOMMENDATIONS. MENTION OF PESTICIDE PRODUCTS ON THIS WEB SITE DOES NOT CONSTITUTE ENDORSEMENT OF ANY MATERIAL.

Text References

United States Department of Agriculture. Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service. Program Aid No. 2010, Issued April 2009.

Arizona Sonora Desert Museum. Onionweed (Asphodelus fistulosus).

Online Resources

APHIS

Search Online

Google Search: Asphodelus fistulosus
Google Images: Asphodelus fistulosus
NatureServe Explorer: Asphodelus fistulosus
USDA Plants: Asphodelus fistulosus
Invasive Plant Atlas of the United States: Asphodelus fistulosus
Bugwood Network Images: Asphodelus fistulosus

Last Updated: 2013-12-05 by HTG
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