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Photographer: John H. Ghent
Source: USDA Forest Service
Cover photo: invasive.org

Gypsy Moth

Lymantria dispar

Origin: Asia

Impact: If established in the United States, each AGM female could lay egg masses that in turn could yield hundreds of voracious caterpillars with appetites for more than 500 species of trees and shrubs. AGM defoliation would severely weaken trees and shrubs, killing them or making them susceptible to diseases and other pests. Caterpillar silk strands, droppings, destroyed leaves, and dead moths would be a nuisance in homes, yards, and parks.

Learn More: Species Profile.

Report Form

If you have spotted Lymantria dispar (Gypsy Moth), use this report form to send an email to the appropriate authorities.

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Comments: Describe the species, impact, infestation or generally what you are seeing.

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